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Lincolnshire councils fear new planning reforms could lead to neighbour disputes

By East Lindsey Target  |  Posted: September 26, 2012

p10 Eddy Poll

Councillor Eddy Poll believes that the changes will lead to more neighbourly disputes, but there would also a danger that a rash of extensions could increase flood risk in certain areas

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CONCERNS that proposed planning reforms could result in 'ad-hoc development' have been raised by council leaders.

East Lindsey District Council and Lincolnshire County Council have both voiced their fears about the possible impact on communities of the Prime Minister's plans to allow larger extensions without the need for planning permission.

Under existing rules, an extension of less than four metres does not need planning permission.

However, the government is consulting on raising the limit to eight metres as part of a package of reforms unveiled by David Cameron and Nick Clegg earlier this month.

Portfolio holder for planning at ELDC, Councillor Craig Leyland, said: "Whilst we recognise the need for development to drive the economy this is already facilitated by the existing planning framework.

"We are extremely concerned about the potential impact of the proposed changes to planning legislation, which would allow homeowners to build out up to 26 feet from their property without the need for planning consent.

"Not only could ad-hoc development cause devaluation in areas of the district but it is also likely to cause chaos in communities with neighbour disputes."

Lincolnshire County Council has asked all district authorities to resist the more relaxed planning rules and follow the lead of Richmond council who have said they will try to block the building "free-for-all".

Executive member for planning at LCC, Councillor Eddy Poll, said: "Not only will these changes inevitably lead to more neighbourly disputes, but there's also a danger that a rash of extensions could increase flood risk in certain areas.

"On top of that, there's undoubtedly going to be an impact on the Lincolnshire landscape.

"Developments of this size have to be carefully considered, balancing the needs of the local community as a whole.

"A free-for-all is not the way to go, and we hope that our district colleagues will do everything they can to stop it from happening."

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  • InsideStory  |  September 30 2012, 7:54PM

    No need to worry too much about new planning regulations as most are passed in lodges and not council offices.

  • baddadbill  |  September 26 2012, 10:27PM

    what a dodgy looking bloke, male councillors with 2 ear rings, no thanks

  • baddadbill  |  September 26 2012, 10:27PM

    what a dodgy looking bloke, male councillors with 2 ear rings, no thanks

  • baddadbill  |  September 26 2012, 10:27PM

    what a dodgy looking bloke, male councillors with 2 ear rings, no thanks

  • Borninskeggy  |  September 26 2012, 5:52PM

    Not strictly true. You can only extend a semi detached property by 3m under permitted development. My proposed conservatory is 4m so I need planning permission. Camerons proposals would have removed this need. I did read the article, but more importantly I understand the regulations.

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  • Borninskeggy  |  September 26 2012, 5:49PM

    Thank you for the advice. Permitted development allows me to extend my semi detached property by 3m. Had I been extending a detached property I am allowed to extend 4m to the rear. My proposed conservatory is 4m, on my semi detached property, and therefore outside of permitted development. I therefore need planning permission. Cameron's proposal would have removed the need for me to gain permission. So not only did I read the article, I also understand the regs.

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  • M_C_Donald  |  September 26 2012, 2:31PM

    "Either way, looks like I'm going to have to get £150 out of my back pocket and submit an application for my proposed conservatory - which wouldn't have needed permission under the proposals." No, unless your conseratory is larger than four metres, see: Under existing rules, an extension of less than four metres does not need planning permission. The concern is where there is and increase from 4 to 8 metres without need for planning permission. I hope that you read the regs better than the article or you could be paying out needleesly.

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  • Borninskeggy  |  September 26 2012, 1:26PM

    I notice there's no reference to the loss of income which the councils would incur..... This is a difficult one to be fair, I guess everyone's trying to to the 'right' thing with these initiatives - but without fully considering all the options. Either way, looks like I'm going to have to get £150 out of my back pocket and submit an application for my proposed conservatory - which wouldn't have needed permission under the proposals.

    |   -1
  • Borninskeggy  |  September 26 2012, 1:26PM

    I notice there's no reference to the loss of income which the councils would incur..... This is a difficult one to be fair, I guess everyone's trying to to the 'right' thing with these initiatives - but without fully considering all the options. Either way, looks like I'm gonna have to get £150 out of my back pocket and submit an application for my proposed conservatory - which wouldn't have needed permission under the proposals.

    |   1
  • Borninskeggy  |  September 26 2012, 1:25PM

    I notice there's no reference to the loss of income which the councils would incur..... This is a difficult one to be fair, I guess everyone's trying to to the 'right' thing with these initiatives - but without fully considering all the options. Either way, looks like I'm gonna have to get £150 out of my back pocket and submit an application for my proposed conservatory - which wouldn't have needed permission under the proposals.

    |   1

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